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Fall 2013

 

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Anthropology (ANTH)
308 Condon, 541-346-5102
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  ANTH 330   Hunters & Gatherers >2 >IC 4.00 cr.
Survey of contemporary hunter-gatherer societies. Foraging, decision-making, exchange, prestige, marriage, gender roles, parenting, history, and demography in an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Sugiyama.
Grading Options: Optional for all students
Instructor: Sugiyama LE-mail Office:   329 Condon Hall
Phone:   (541) 346-5142
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes

Lecture

17835 30 80 1600-1720 mw 240A MCK Sugiyama L  

Final Exam:

1515-1715 w 12/11 240A MCK
 
Associated Sections

+ Dis

18104 11 20 0900-0950 f 122 MCK Henry J  

+ Dis

18105 10 20 1000-1050 f 11 PAC Henry J  

+ Dis

18106 5 20 1100-1150 f 475 MCK Henry J  

+ Dis

18107 4 20 1200-1250 f 193 ANS Henry J  

+ Dis

18108 cancelled 1300-1350 f   tba See CRN for CommentsApproval Required

+ Dis

18109 cancelled 1400-1450 f   tba See CRN for CommentsApproval Required
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
September 29:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 6:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 6:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
October 7:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 7:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 9:   Add this course
October 9:   Last day to change to or from audit
October 13:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
October 20:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
October 27:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
November 17:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
November 17:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 364 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
For the vast majority of human existence survival rested solely upon what could be acquired through the hunting, fishing, or gathering of wild resources, and the fundamental qualities that make us human were shaped by the recurrent features of the physical and social environments our ancestors encountered as foragers. To fully understand what it means to be human, one must therefore understand our foraging legacy. While no modern hunter-gatherer group is a "living fossil" of our evolutionary past, collectively they can provide insight into the kinds of adaptive problems our ancestors faced (i.e., recurrent problems which shaped human evolution), the adaptations which selection yielded in response to these problems, and how these adaptations have yielded different solutions in response to differing local environments.

From Africa to Australia, neo-tropical South America to the Arctic, this class surveys a diverse set of hunter-gatherer societies that survived into the modern era. We will explore how different hunter-gatherer groups interact with their physical and social environment in the process of acquiring and sharing foods, allocating labor, raising children, and deciding where to live and when to move, largely from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. The class attempts to achieve a balance between a review of ethnographic information about hunter-gatherer groups, the scientific theories for understanding both recurrent and variable aspects of people's behavior across these groups, and the data used to support or disconfirm those hypotheses. We will also consider what generalizations, if any, can be made about hunter-gatherer life that might help us better understand ourselves as a hunting and gathering species living in a modern industrial world.

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