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Winter 2014

 

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Folklore (FLR)
118 Prince Lucien Campbell, 541-346-3911
Folklore, College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  FLR 235   Folklore & Supernatur >1 4.00 cr.
Introduces the study of beliefs about the supernatural by examining diverse approaches to the description and analysis of belief traditions and religious culture.
Grading Options: Graded for Majors; Optional for all other students
Instructor: Wojcik DE-mail Office:   463 PLC
Phone:   (541) 346-3946
Additional Web Resources AvailableWeb-related Resources: Course Description
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  27564 1 40 1200-1320 tr 100 AGH Wojcik D Additional Web Resources Available

Final Exam:

0800-1000 w 3/19 100 AGH
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
January 5:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
January 12:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
January 12:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
January 13:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
January 13:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
January 15:   Add this course
January 15:   Last day to change to or from audit
January 19:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
January 26:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
February 2:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
February 23:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
February 23:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 364 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
This course introduces students to the research questions and theoretical models used by folklorists and other cultural theorists in the study of beliefs that express the relationship of human beings to the "supernatural." We will examine a diversity of belief traditions and encounters as these are reflected within the context of narrative, ritual, healing, apparitions, pilgrimage, visions, and possession states. The course focuses on people’s lived experiences, beliefs, and practices—the “folk” or vernacular expressive culture that exists apart from institutionalized doctrine and authority. This class is not concerned with attempts to prove or disprove the existence of supernatural phenomena, but with the expression of popular beliefs, experiences, and traditions as these have been analyzed from various ethnographic and theoretical perspectives.

The course is organized to reflect specific topics and areas of research that have preoccupied folklorists and other scholars, and we will explore the issues and approaches that have informed their studies. Particular attention is given to the personal and cultural meanings of supernatural beliefs in relation to issues of community, gender, and ethnicity; the dynamics of religious institutional power and vernacular belief; the hegemonic or potentially oppositional aspects of supernatural belief; and the ways that folk beliefs about the supernatural may reflect existential anxieties and issues of ultimate concern.

This course fulfills a lower division requirement for the Folklore certificate. If the Folklore major and minor are approved, it will also fulfill a lower division requirement for those degrees. It is proposed that this course fulfill the group-satisfying requirement in Arts and Letters, because it introduces students to modes of inquiry central to the discipline of folklore studies. Students will be introduced to a wide range of perspectives and theoretical approaches to the study of folklore, including ethnographic research methods and theories of culture, narrative, genre, identity, ethnicity, and gender, as these apply to the study of belief and vernacular religious expression in a diversity of social and cultural contexts.

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