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Spring 2014

 

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Anthropology (ANTH)
308 Condon, 541-346-5102
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  ANTH 347   Archaeo Ancient Cities >2 >IC 4.00 cr.
The archaeology of ancient cities from around the world. Offered alternate years.
Grading Options: Graded for Majors; Optional for all other students
Instructor: Gallagher DE-mail Office:   308 Condon Hall
Only Open to Majors Within:
(before 03/07)  
College of Arts & Sciences
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes

Lecture

32889 55 120 1600-1720 tr 123 PAC Gallagher D  

Final Exam:

1300-1500 t 6/10 123 PAC
 
Associated Sections

+ Lab

32890 cancelled 0800-0850 w   tba See CRN for CommentsApproval Required

+ Lab

32891 cancelled 0900-0950 w   tba See CRN for CommentsApproval Required

+ Lab

32892 2 20 1000-1050 w 204 CON Ainis A  

+ Lab

32893 7 20 1100-1150 w 204 CON Ainis A  

+ Lab

32894 13 20 1400-1450 w 204 CON Ainis A  

+ Lab

32895 6 20 1500-1550 w 204 CON Dexter-Enriquez J  

+ Lab

32896 12 20 1600-1650 w 204 CON Dexter-Enriquez J  

+ Lab

39161 15 20 1700-1750 w 204 CON Dexter-Enriquez J  
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
March 30:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
April 6:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
April 6:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
April 7:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
April 7:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
April 9:   Add this course
April 9:   Last day to change to or from audit
April 13:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
April 20:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
April 27:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
May 18:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
May 18:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 364 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
Cities are common throughout the world today, with most people living in these dynamic social environments. However, cities are a relatively new phenomenon in human history. In this course we will explore diverse case studies of ancient cities from throughout the world to see how and why humans began constructing and inhabiting urban environments.

This class explores the archaeological record, history, architecture, and other disciplines, to examine how ancient cities reflected the social, political, religious and economic organization and ideologies of the societies that created and lived in them, as well as how cities were adapted and transformed to meet new needs. It satisfies the criteria for group status in the social sciences because it covers a representative sample of the major issues, debates, and questions relating to prehistoric urbanism. In so doing, we expose students to the diverse theoretical approaches scholars use to understand these past societies from different forms of archaeological data. Drawing primarily on the archaeological record, but also incorporating data from history, architecture, and other disciplines, we will examine how ancient cities reflected the social, political, religious and economic organization and ideologies of the societies that created and lived in them, as well as how cities were adapted and transformed to meet new needs. For each case, we will look broadly at city principles, planning, architecture, demography, and social and cultural symbolism (the “meaning” of the city), then focus in depth on one or two particularly notable case studies. Through this comparative approach, students will gain an appreciation for common themes and cultural diversity in ancient urban environments. Potential regions covered may include Mesopotamia, China, South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Mesoamerica, the Andes, North America, and others.

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