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Fall 2014

 

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Astronomy (ASTR)
120 Willamette, 541-346-4751
Physics
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  ASTR 121   The Solar System >3 4.00 cr.
Naked-eye astronomy, development of astronomical concepts, and the solar system.
Grading Options: Optional for all students
Instructor: Fisher RE-mail Office:   145 Willamette Hall
Phone:   (541) 346-4799
Office Hours: 1100 - 1200 F  
  1600 - 1700 T  
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  10957 3 216 1730-1920 tr 100 WIL Fisher R  

Final Exam:

1915-2115 t 12/09 100 WIL
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
September 28:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 5:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 5:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
October 6:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 6:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 8:   Add this course
October 8:   Last day to change to or from audit
October 12:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
October 19:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
October 26:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
November 16:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
November 16:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 364 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
The course is an introduction to the science of astronomy for non-science majors with an emphasis on the exploration of the Solar System. The past 20 years has seen an explosion in our understanding of the contents, formation and evolution of the Solar System, mainly due to numerous NASA missions/probes to eight of the nine planets. The study of the characteristics of the other planets has provided tremendous insight into the understanding of how our own planet (Earth) operates and changes under mankind's influence. The purpose of this course is to educate the student on the basic science behind our exploration of the Solar System so you may make informed choices as future/current voters on issues of our environment and the future of science in this country.

The specific goals of this class are to 1) To gain an understanding of basic science that underlies astronomy (the forum is the exploration of our Solar System), 2) to explore the properties of the objects that make up our Solar System, and 3) to achieve an understanding of how the evolution of other planets has an impact on how we make choices to manage our own environment. In addition, this course traces the history of our developing knowledge of the Solar System in order to explore how the scientific method works and how civilization has gained from the progress of science and technology. The interplay between technology (telescopes, robotic space probes) and knowledge gained about the Solar System is a key theme to the course.

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