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Fall 2015

 

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Physics (PHYS)
120 Willamette, 541-346-4751
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  PHYS 155   Phys Behind Internet >3 4.00 cr.
How discoveries in 20th-century physics mesh to drive modern telecommunications. Topics include electron mobility in matter, the development of transistors and semiconductors, lasers, and optical fibers.
Grading Options: Optional for all students
Instructor: Corwin EE-mail Office:   373 Willamette Hall
Phone:   (541) 346-4697
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  16265 14 40 1300-1350 mwf 110 WIL Corwin E  

Final Exam:

1445-1645 r 12/10 110 WIL
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
September 27:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 4:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 4:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
October 5:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 5:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 7:   Add this course
October 7:   Last day to change to or from audit
October 11:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
October 18:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
October 25:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
November 15:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
November 15:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 364 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
The Internet is a network of millions of computers capable of exchanging data files containing information. The technology that makes this possible is the result of the efforts of tens of thousands of physicists, engineers, and computer scientists over more than a hundred years. The development of the Internet is an amazing story of the transformation of fundamental physics discoveries into practical systems. This course is a non-science major's introduction to the physical concepts that explain how information is stored, transmitted, processed, and retrieved. Fundamental issues in physics will be discussed using only elementary math and simple algebra.
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Release: 8.8.2