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English Literature (ENG)
118 Prince Lucien Campbell, 541-346-3911
English
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  ENG 335   Inventing Arguments >1 4.00 cr.
Analysis and use of patterns of reasoning derived from the disciplines of rhetoric, informal logic, cognitive science, and the theory of argumentation.
Grading Options: Graded for Majors; Optional for all other students
Instructor: Frank DE-mailHomepage Office:   210 Chapman Hall
Phone:   (541) 346-4198
Office Hours: 1000 - 1230 M  
  1400 - 1530 T  
Not Open to Majors Within:
See CRN for CommentsPrereqs/Comments: Prereq: WR 122 or WR 123.
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  12096 4 40 1200-1320 tr 248 GER Frank D !

Final Exam:

0800-1000 f 12/09 248 GER
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
September 25:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 2:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 2:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
October 3:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 3:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 5:   Add this course
October 5:   Last day to change to or from audit
October 9:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
October 16:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
October 23:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
November 13:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
November 13:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 101 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
335 studies the analysis and use of patterns of reasoning derived from the disciplines of rhetoric, informal logic, cognitive science, and the theory of argumentation. Prereq: WR 122 or equivalent.

Inventing Arguments is a standing course now being proposed for Groups Satisfying Status.

This course satisfies an Arts and Letters Group requirement. It is designed to provide students with an understanding of the rhetorical principles that underlie the invention of arguments, i.e. the process that leads to the selection of premises and appeals that become the basis for reasoned argument. It is a study of the rational processes that underlie the contingent and situated formation of logical and quasi-logical appeals. A theoretical understanding of these principles is gained by selective readings in classical rhetoric (i.e. topical invention as described by Aristotle and stasis invention as systemized in later rhetorical theory), in informal logic (as developed by pragmatist philosophers and modern scholars), in cognitive science, and in the field of argumentation studies. A practical understanding of these principles is gained through exercises in the construction of arguments according to techniques developed by these disciplines.

  • Topical invention is the development of rhetorical syllogisms (enthymemes) based on general and specific topi, or premises assumed to function as grounds for all types of arguments.
  • Stasis invention is a forensic technique for isolating kinds of questions at issue and the lines of reasoning necessary to address them.
  • Informal logic is a study of the types of appeals made in relation to probable claims, and the pragmatic and ethical conditions that give rise to them.
  • Cognitive invention studies the interactions of denotation and metaphor to map the universe of claims.
  • Argumentation studies involve all of the strategic “moves” and rhetorical appeals made available according to the relation of the arguer to a particular audience.
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