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Winter 2017

 

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International Studies (INTL)
175 Prince Lucien Campbell, 541-346-5051
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  INTL 370   Internat Human Rights >2 >IP 4.00 cr.
Survey of human rights, examining diverse perspectives on the concept, practice, and implementation of human rights and human rights regimes.
Grading Options: Graded for Majors; Optional for all other students
Instructor: Johnson WE-mail Office:   300W Oregon Hall
Phone:   (541) 346-4713
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  26972 2 90 1600-1750 tr 240A MCK Johnson W  

Final Exam:

1230-1430 m 3/20 240A MCK
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
January 8:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
January 15:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
January 15:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
January 16:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
January 16:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
January 18:   Add this course
January 18:   Last day to change to or from audit
January 22:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
January 29:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
February 5:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
February 26:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
February 26:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 101 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
This is a survey course covering the history, theory, and practice of human rights. Emphasis will be placed on the normative context within which human rights discourses develop, followed by an explanation of how and why international institutions support (or inhibit) the protection of human rights in local contexts. Drawing on the instructor's legal background, students will also be introduced to the practice of human rights law in domestic, regional, and international courts. The overriding goal of the course is for the students to begin to address three foundational questions:

1 - What are human rights, or, rather, what should they be?
2 - How do human rights "function" in today's world? (i.e. How do political and legal institutions, including NGOs, actually "do" human rights work?), and;
3 - Do human rights matter? (i.e. What are the practical possibilities and limitations that inform the ability of the international human rights regime to achieve its stated goals?).

As a 300-level course, we will aim to get a sense of relevant, contemporary human rights issues through academic analysis, empirical evidence, and cultural inquiry. Students will develop a sense of the diverse perspectives on these issues internationally, while critically exploring the possibilities and contestations involved in human rights as a concept and as practice. This course will prepare students to study these issues in greater depth in their 400-level courses and graduate school.

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Release: 8.8.2