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Spring 2017

 

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History (HIST)
275 McKenzie Hall, 541-346-4802
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  HIST 352   US in the 1960s >2 4.00 cr.
Exploration of a watershed era: civil rights, student activism, educational crisis, Vietnam War, gender revolution, environmentalism.
Grading Options: Graded for Majors; Optional for all other students
Instructor: Beda SE-mail Office:   340A McKenzie Hall
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  32651 1 200 1400-1520 mw 282 LIL Beda S  

Final Exam:

1445-1645 w 6/14 282 LIL
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
April 2:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
April 9:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
April 9:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
April 10:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
April 10:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
April 12:   Add this course
April 12:   Last day to change to or from audit
April 16:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
April 23:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
April 30:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
May 21:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
May 21:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 364 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
This course will be a place to read, think, and talk about the 1960s in two particular ways: as a watershed in modern U.S. history and as an era whose contested reputation continues to preoccupy scholars and observers. Issues and images associated with the 1960s inspire some Americans, trouble others, and serve as reference points for us all. Why is this the case? The course will investigate how the history of the 1960s has been challenged and changed by recent scholarship. Why, for example, is a period still popularly perceived as a progressive era of civil rights victories, student activism, feminist revolution, and counter-culture emerging as a turning point in the histories of racial anti-liberalism, educational crisis, and cultural and political conservatism? How can we come to terms with the stunning defeat in Vietnam in the post-1989 era of Cold War triumphalism and the post-2001 era of global war on terror? Interpretive fashions have changed, but the consensus points to the 1960s as a critical dividing line in modern U.S. history, culture and politics. What exactly do the 1960s represent? Are the 1960s even over yet?
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Release: 8.8