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Fall 2017

 

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Physics (PHYS)
120 Willamette, 541-346-4751
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  PHYS 181   Quantum Mechn Everyone >3 4.00 cr.
Introduction to quantum mechanics, a set of sometimes counterintuitive scientific principals describing atoms and light, along with the modern technologies it makes possible.
Grading Options: Optional for all students
Instructor: Raymer ME-mail Office:   276 Willamette Hall
Phone:   (541) 346-4785
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  14985 15 25 1300-1450 tr 107 KLA Raymer M  
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
September 24:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 1:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 1:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
October 2:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 2:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 4:   Add this course
October 4:   Last day to change to or from audit
October 8:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
October 15:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
October 22:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
November 12:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
November 12:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 364 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
For students majoring in a non-science or a science other than physics, with good aptitude for high-school science. The course is a largely non-mathematical introduction to quantum mechanics, the theory of nature at its most fundamental level describing the behavior of physical objects on the scale of atoms. Although the fruits of our understanding of quantum mechanics (QM), such as lasers, computers, and magnetic resonance imaging are familiar technologies, the inner working of atoms and the behavior of electrons and photons are anything but familiar. The realization that the quantum realm behaves very differently than the realm of ordinary human-scale objects is one of humanity's greatest intellectual achievements. Development of quantum mechanics over the past century has led to many modern technologies, and promises new ones in the near future. You may enjoy this course if you have an interest in the sometimes counter-intuitive behaviors exhibited by the very small, for example the electrons and photons that make up atoms and light. Using only basic algebra, students will learn about the experiments that led to the creation of QM, explore the theoretical ideas of QM, and learn about modern applications such as quantum cryptography and quantum computing. The course employs active, inquiry-based teaching methods to improve creative and critical reasoning. Students will learn through hands-on in-class activities, including experimenting with lasers. The course is quite rigorous, and will expose you to highly creative thinking, for example, by addressing questions such as "How is the physical behavior of elementary quantum objects fundamentally different than that of familiar, human-scale objects?" Beyond exploring exciting areas of contemporary science, our goals will be to improve critical reasoning abilities and writing and presentation skills, especially with respect to quantitative data.
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