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Summer 2018

 

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Sociology (SOC)
736 Prince Lucien Campbell, 541-346-5002
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  SOC 399   Sp St White Hetr Mascl 4.00 cr.
In this course we will examine groups and identities that are often not discussed in social science courses. What do we mean by whiteness, heterosexuality, and masculinity? How have understandings of them changed over time and how do they differ across cultures? We will explore these questions and more to gain a critical understanding of these social categories and their place in American society.
Grading Options: Graded for Majors; Optional for all other students
Instructor: Silva TE-mail Office:   736 PLC
Phone:   (541) 346-5002


Instructor: Woody AE-mailHomepage Office:   736 PLC
Phone:   (541) 346-5002
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  41924 19 45 1200-1350 mtwr
6/25-7/22
128 CHI Silva T  
Woody A
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
June 26:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
June 27:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded)
June 28:   Last day to change to or from audit
June 28:   Add this course
June 28:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
July 2:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
July 4:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
July 12:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
July 12:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 101 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
In this course we will examine groups and identities that are often not discussed in social science courses. What do we mean by whiteness, heterosexuality, and masculinity? How have understandings of them changed over time and how do they differ across cultures?

Historical research shows, for instance, that many European groups were not considered “white” until around the 1930s-1940s. Why and how did this change? Similarly, many men and women in the Victorian era had romantic friendships that involved cuddling, to sleeping in the same bed, and even more--and no one considered that unusual. Indeed, “heterosexual” as an identity was not even used until the late nineteenth century, and it took decades for many people in the US to begin identifying as such. Even today, many men have sex with men, and women have sex with women, while still identifying as straight. What explains this? And why is it that today men usually cannot hold hands without being labeled as gay, bisexual, or feminine, whereas a century ago most people did not think of it as anything remarkable?

What do whiteness, heterosexuality, and masculinity mean today? How do they differ across contexts? How do they intersect, and what are the consequences? We will explore these questions and more to gain a critical understanding of these social categories and their place in American society.

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