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Winter 2020

 

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International Studies (INTL)
175 Prince Lucien Campbell, 541-346-5051
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  INTL 340   Global Health & Devel >2 >GP >IC 4.00 cr.
Introduction to major issues in global health, their causes and possible solutions, with a focus on the poor in developing countries.
Grading Options: Graded for Majors; Optional for all other students
Instructor: Yarris KE-mailHomepage Office:   313 PLC
Phone:   (541) 346-1363
Office Hours: 1000 - 1200 M 313 PLC - Fall 2015
  1200 - 1400 M 313 PLC - Winter 2016
Additional Web Resources AvailableWeb-related Resources: INTL 340 Syllabus
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes

Lecture

26853 12 142 1400-1520 tr 220 CHA Yarris K Additional Web Resources Available
 
Associated Sections

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27151 1 24 0900-0950 f 252 STB Fouts M  

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27152 1 24 1200-1250 f 104 CON Camacho A  

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27153 0 24 1600-1650 r 105 PETR Camacho A  

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27154 5 24 1200-1250 f 107 PETR Fouts M  

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27155 0 23 1300-1350 f 101 PETR Fouts M  

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27156 5 23 1700-1750 r 107 PETR Camacho A  
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
January 5:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
January 11:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
January 11:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
January 12:   Process a complete withdrawal (90% refund, W recorded)
January 12:   Withdraw from this course (100% refund, W recorded)
January 13:   Add this course
January 15:   Last day to change to or from audit
January 19:   Process a complete withdrawal (75% refund, W recorded)
January 19:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
January 26:   Process a complete withdrawal (50% refund, W recorded)
January 26:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
February 2:   Process a complete withdrawal (25% refund, W recorded)
February 2:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
February 23:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
February 23:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 101 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
Health is arguably the main objective of international development. Indeed, three of the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals are themselves indicators of improving health: Reduce Child Mortality; Improve Maternal Health; and Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and other diseases. Equally important, poor health and disease also act to inhibit progress towards social and economic development goals.

Most of us who live in rich countries are healthier than at any time in human history. Yet, millions of people across the globe – mainly in poor countries - needlessly suffer and die of preventable or treatable illness and disease every year. That such a situation should continue to exist in the 21st century when wealth, global communications and medical advances provide the means to eliminate this disparity is scandalous, and morally unacceptable.

Using a multi-disciplinary approach drawing heavily on readings from Public Health, Social Epidemiology, and Medical Anthropology, this course will introduce students to the striking inequities in health between rich and poor countries, and between the rich and poor within countries. We will examine the forces that conspire against health for the poor and vulnerable, particularly in developing countries, and consider the building blocks of good health in social conditions and medical systems. We will examine the relationship between culture and health and methodological implications for global health research and practice. We will look in detail at the relationship between income inequality and health through specific case studies in women’s health, HIV/AIDS, and organ trafficking. We will also critically assess the Epidemiological Transition, the shifting trend towards chronic diseases and the persistence of infectious diseases globally. We will assess international frameworks for health, including the Alma-Ata convention and the goal of Health for All. Finally we will reflect on the ethical and moral dimensions of global health.

The course satisfies Social Science group criteria in that it addresses the subject of global health by considering the broad social, political, economic and cultural forces impacting health at the individual, family, community and country levels. In doing so, it covers a cross-section of key issues, analyses and perspectives of current social science scholars. It looks at the availability (or lack of availability) of modern medical and technological advances to support good health among disadvantaged groups developing countries.

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