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Summer 2018

 

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Philosophy (PHIL)
211 Susan Campbell, 541-346-5547
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  PHIL 102   Ethics >1 4.00 cr.
Philosophical study of morality (e.g., ethical relativism; justification of moral judgments; concepts of duty, right, and wrong).
Grading Options: Optional; see degree guide or catalog for degree requirements
Instructor: Sheehey BE-mail
Additional Web Resources AvailableWeb-related Resources: Syllabus for PHIL 102
Course Materials
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  41751 10 35 1000-1150 mtwr
7/23-8/19
202 CAS Sheehey B Additional Web Resources Available
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
July 24:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
July 25:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded)
July 26:   Last day to change to or from audit
July 26:   Add this course
July 26:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
July 30:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
August 1:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
August 9:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
August 9:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 101 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
The course is about relations with others that concern human well being. Its philosophical aim is for students to understand the intellectual beliefs assumed in their opinions and values and to learn how to analytically defend those beliefs and engage in critical dialogue about them. Student participation is encouraged throughout and the focus is on the individual?s moral or ethical system. Ideas that all moral beliefs are relative are challenged early on and a concept of moral universalism is built up through the practice of giving reasons for beliefs. The reading, thinking and writing in the course is abstract in its focus on philosophical views but also concrete through the use of literary and real life examples. Students are required to engage in moral theory by contrasting, comparing and choosing among the different moral systems of deontology, utilitarianism and virtue ethics.
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Release: 8.9.1