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Winter 2021

 

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Sociology (SOC)
736 Prince Lucien Campbell, 541-346-5002
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  SOC 410   Soc of Corruption 4.00 cr.
Repeatable.
Grading Options: Optional; see degree guide or catalog for degree requirements
Instructor: Listrovaya LE-mail Office:   605 PLC
Office Hours: 14 - 16 M Also by appointment
Not Open to Majors Within:
Course Materials
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  25051 0 40 1615-1745 mw 00 REMOTE Listrovaya L  
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
January 3:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
January 9:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
January 9:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
January 10:   Process a complete withdrawal (90% refund, W recorded)
January 10:   Withdraw from this course (100% refund, W recorded)
January 11:   Add this course
January 11:   Last day to change to or from audit
January 17:   Process a complete withdrawal (75% refund, W recorded)
January 17:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
January 24:   Process a complete withdrawal (50% refund, W recorded)
January 24:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
January 31:   Process a complete withdrawal (25% refund, W recorded)
January 31:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
February 21:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
February 21:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 101 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
“Corruption” is a very strong and loud word. Media and press seem to be constantly yelling about corruption scandals; economists, politicians, and world leaders, everyone is talking about the big “C” word nowadays. But what does “Corruption” stand for? How is corruption connected to culture and society? What is the relationship between corruption and inequality? Can corruption be good? This course addresses these questions by providing a sociological understanding of corruption.

In this course, specific attention will be paid to studying the connection between macro and micro processes; corruption and culture; corruption and society; corruption and inequality. The course will start with teaching the basics: the role of social capital and social networks. Further in the course we will analyze a variety of definitions, opinions, and theories applicable to corruption studies. We will also explore the ways how political, economic, and sociological processes affect the formation and development of corruption. These topics will be examined through the prism of social institutions, cultural contexts, an informal exchange. With the help of comparative analysis, we will gain insight into the corruption practices that characterize different countries. You will have an opportunity to learn and apply your knowledge to analyze current corruption instances. By reading academic articles, discussing reports, and watching special investigations, you will get to analyze a variety of cases and specifics of corruption across the globe. At the end of the course you will present your research project on a particular corruption case of your choice.

Please note: This course primarily explores corruption from an international perspective; it does not focus solely on corruption in the US.

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Release: 8.9.1